Tuesday, November 16, 2010

Woodlanders

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Woods and forests are magical locations - places of mystery and faerie tales; wildlife and free food; pleasant walks and sustainable resources.

“Woodlanders” is a new book all about life in Britain’s forests, with writings and photos about the use of wood in ancient and new eco-buildings, the people who live and work with wood, and the community projects replanting native species and introducing new generations to the wonders of the woodlands.



With sections on everything from craft workers to compost toilets and even a recipe on birch sap wine, it’s the kind of book that makes you want to surround yourself with trees and breathe in moss, leaves sweet sap.

Featured in this book (pages 150-154) is an article about willow sculptor, Trevor Leat, whose amazing creations I’ve photographed several times (see Burns Light Festival and Wickerman posts, for example). And to accompany the article I was asked if some of my photos could be used.

Although you have to search through the small print of the Acknowledgements at the back to find my name, it is there, meaning I’ve not only had my images in magazines, I’ve now got some in a book that wasn’t even produced by me. Which is rather nice.





For anyone interested, it can be found on Amazon here.

Or for a peek at some of the pages and an interview with the editor, visit the publisher's pages here.

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19 comments:

mapstew said...

Well done you. Looks like a very interesting book. :¬)

Ponita in Real Life said...

How very cool that your photos are used in that book!

Forests are indeed magical... I love wandering forests with giant trees, smelling of earth and damp... the sound of your footfalls muffled in the pine needles and moss underfoot... the sunlight filtered through many layers of green boughs overhead.

debra said...

I remember when you posted those amazing photos! Now I will be off to visit the links (o)

Jayne Martin said...

That's just all kinds of cool! Congratulations.

Litzi said...

Terrific publicity for your incredible photography…and gratis! Congratulations!

Pat said...

Every day I give thanks for the privilege of living amongst tree tops. This looks a lovely book and it's great you are associated with it. Well done:)

The Lassie & Laddie said...

I am very impressed but not at all surprised - your pictures are gorgeous!

hope said...

As a "tree person" this was very interesting. That you are included by way of photos is fantastic! :)

Sausage Fingers said...

Looks great, when does the give away competition begin?
Cheers...

Falak said...

Congrats Kim! That book makes me wish I lived near a forest.

Kim Ayres said...

Mapstew - thank you :)

Ponita - I think they stir something quite primeval in us

Debra - that 2nd one is the one I won a camera with last year. It's done me well has that photo :)

Jayne - thank you :)

Litzi - with my name only appearing in small print on a large page of acknowledgements, it's not really going to generate any publicity for me, but it's nice knowing I have photos published in a book :)

Pat - thank you :)

The Lassie & Laddie - thank you :)

Hope - one day I'd love to have a treehouse :)

Sausage fingers - competition? I only have the one complimentary book so I'm afraid I'm not giving it away

Falak - what kind of environment do you live in?

DiamondsOnMySoles said...

wow that's pretty cool! well done kim! :o)

Alice said...

Wahoo! That's amazing...and as Lassie mentioned...not at all surprising. Destined for greatness!

Kim Ayres said...

Diamonds - thank you :)

Alice - thank you, although I don't believe in destiny at all. Density, on the other hand, is clearly a force of the universe :) (old physics joke)

Carole said...

I love the woods and forests. One clear word of caution though. They have spiders in them.

That being said, Congrats on your pictures. Obviously the author can spot a good picture when he sees it. Very nice.

Kim Ayres said...

Carole - fortunately there are no native poisoness spiders in the UK :)

A Daft Scots Lass said...

What a gorgeous book!

bodgermorg said...

A huge undertaking beautifully realized. I grew up literally in the woods. My father was a woodcutter by trade, pulpwood and firewood. I'm a bit of a bodger and carver myself. On the topic of birch wine, It is possible to render birch sap into syrup in the same way that it's done with maples. I don't know what the amount required would be, but for maples (cousins used to run a sap house) it's 40 gallons of sap to a gallon of syrup.

Kim Ayres said...

Morg - according to the book, birch sap is much less sugary than maple, so it has to be boiled for longer. They reckon a litre of sap will make about 100ml of syrup, so it's going to be an intensive and expensive process